Free book summary - Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers

Posted on 2/3/2020, 9:57:33 PM

Main Theme: Self-Made Success is a Myth

“Outliers” demonstrates extraordinary success results from a rare combination of opportunity, luck and legacy, not only ability and hard work. The outliers who have achieved great success tend to have started with a small advantage that accumulates over time.

Key Points

The Self-Made Man Doesn’t Exist

Community, family and historical factors contribute to outliers’ success. They didn’t achieve extraordinary success solely through hard work and perseverance, despite the myth of the American dream. Most Americans overestimate the possibility of upward mobility, which perpetuates systemic inequalities.

Qualities for Success Have a Threshold

Qualities needed for success in a particular industry, such as height for basketball players, only matter so much. After someone reaches a threshold for a certain skill, other factors matter more when assessing whether someone will achieve extraordinary success.

Mastering a Skill Requires 10,000+ Hours of Practice

Gladwell’s theory is mastery of a complex skill requires a minimum of 10,000 hours of practice. Spending that much time on one skill often means a person has to start learning at a young age and have access to essential tools and knowledge.

Birth Month and Year Affect Achievement

Kids are often subject to cutoffs based on the month they were born. Their age in relation to their peers impacts their performance. Comparing the physical ability and maturity of two children nearly a year apart causes unfair advantages. The older child will naturally be physically bigger than the younger one and perform better. Meanwhile, the younger child is often more immature than the older one in the classroom and seems to perform worse.

Children born in the right year are positioned to reach their 10,000 hours of practice at the right time. Many software tycoons were born between 1954 and 1956, allowing them to become masters at the time the industry started to boom. The timing is pure luck, but it gives a huge advantage.

Upbringing Impacts Success

Knowing how to negotiate helps people work toward their goals. Parents typically teach kids how to interact with others, and sociologists found wealthier parents instill a higher sense of entitlement in their children, giving them the advantage of knowing to ask for what they want.

Culture Changes Achievement

Culture shapes how people communicate. Recent studies show people who speak more than one language experience the world differently depending on what language they use. Traditions also place emphasis on different skills. When children learn the words for numbers in Asian languages, they also learn to add those numbers. Rice farming, a mainstay of Asian culture, requires the concentration and persistence needed to solve difficult math problems, supporting studies that found kids from Asian countries will keep working on a math problem long after kids in Western countries have given up.

Final Thought: How to Overcome Barriers to Success

Recognizing the reasons why certain people achieve extraordinary success helps others overcome disadvantages. Schools can create programs to ensure kids from low-income families have the same opportunities as their wealthier peers. Companies can assess cultural differences to find ways to support a diverse staff and utilize the benefits of multiple perspectives.


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